Is Corporate Communications going to disappear?

with 4 Comments

LONDON — Recent analysis or Corporate Communications functions provides some surprising insights.

Something has happened to Corporate Communications.  Not only are times changing but time has changed the function. Its future is now in doubt.  And while that news is sobering, it is not necessarily the end of Corporate Communications.  Many functions are already finding solutions.  We examine these developments here.Corporate Communications

From analysis of multinational corporations on five continents in 2012 Able and How has turned up some alarming and arresting findings. The Corporate Communications function has changed in many ways.  Its budgets have been cut, reporting lines redrawn, and it’s suddenly in the unenviable position of needing to make the case for a seat at any table.  But amidst this unsettling news are also the early signs of the way forward.

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4 Responses

  1. A Cudworth
    |

    Slightly concerning that communicators in Europe are not making as much headway as we’re led to believe, especially given the UK Government’s investment into employee engagement, and the numerous peak bodies representing sections of the comms profession. Australia needs the UK to show real leadership in this area, to give us the impetus and blueprint from which to build our own standards and reputation. It’s amazing that after all these years, there are still no barriers to entering the profession.

  2. Ezri Carlebach
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    The paper raises a number of interesting points, including the idea that being “closer to the customer” means being “further away from the central decision-makers of the business”.
    What does that say about the relationship between decision makers and customers? And does it provide the corporate communications folk the opportunity to remind themselves of their role as a bridge between the two?

  3. Julia Lloyd
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    I think there are a lot of positive points to draw from this piece of research. Change management is a great area of opportunity for communicators. The chance to enable change within a function or project or indeed programme is also a chance to prove value whether at local level or on a larger scale.

    I’m happy that communicators often sit within the business and away from the centre, often there’s a reason that they are there and that’s to deliver projects for local business areas. By staying close to the grass roots they can build contacts, understand local needs and again show they are delivering value.

    The danger is more that with communicators working in local functions they can lose touch with the central comms team and vice versa. However a strong comms plan that takes account of local as well as company-wide needs should be able to account for this and work it to everyone’s advantage.

    The need to prove value will only get more pressing, thankfully cheap, online survey tools and good networks of ‘feedback champions’ should allow communicators to choose the most effective and cost-effective channels for their business.

  4. […] area, such as digital. This week I read a report from David Ferrabee at Able & How called The Uncertain Future of Corporate Communications. If you’d like to read the document in full, you can request it by contacting them […]

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